Abbotswood Junior School SEN Information Report

  1. How does the school know if children need extra help and what should I do if I think my child may have special educational needs?
  2. How will the school support my child?
  3. How will the curriculum be matched to my child’s needs?
  4. How will both school and I know how my child is doing and how will you help me to support my child’s learning? 
  5. What support will there be for my child’s overall well-being? 
  6. What specialist services and expertise are available at or accessed by the school?  
  7. What training has the staff supporting children with SEND had or having? 
  8. How will my child be included in activities outside the classroom, including school trips? 
  9. How accessible is the school environment? 
  10. How will the school prepare and support my child to join the school, transfer to a new setting or the next stage of education and life? 
  11. How are the school’s resources allocated and matched to children’s special educational needs? 
  12. How is the decision made about what type and how much support my child will receive?
  13. How are parents involved in the school? How can I be involved? 
  14. Who can I contact for further information? 

1. How does the school know if children need extra help and what should I do if I think my child may have special educational needs?

At Abbotswood Junior School, children are identified as having special educational needs through a variety of ways, including the following:

  • Liaison with infant/previous school.
  • Child performing below age expected levels.
  • Concerns raised by parent.
  • Concerns raised by teacher (eg behaviour or self-esteem  affecting performance)
  • Liaison with external agencies (eg Educational Psychologist, Speech and Language Therapist etc)
  • Medical diagnosis through paediatrician.
  • Initial contact for any concerns should be with your child’s class teacher, then with the Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator (SENCo)/Inclusion Manager.

Back to top

2. How will the school support my child?

  • Our Inclusion Manager/SENCo oversees all support and progress of any child requiring additional support across the school.
  • The class teacher will oversee, plan and work with each child with SEND in their class to ensure that progress is made in every area.
  • Learning Support Assistants (LSAs) work with all children either individually or as part of a group in literacy and/or maths as directed by the class teacher.
  • LSAs may also carry out intervention programmes for a limited time with either individuals or groups as directed by the SENCo. The regularity of these sessions will be explained to parents when the support starts.
  • The class teacher will meet with parents at Parents’ Evenings to discuss your child’s needs, support and progress.
  • For further information the SENCo is available to discuss support in more detail.
  • The SENCo reports to Governors (via the governor with responsibility for SEN) termly to inform them about the progress of children with SEN (special educational needs). This report does not refer to individual children and confidentiality is maintained at all times.
    • The Governors agree priorities for spending within the SEN budget with the overall aim that all children receive the support they need in order to make progress.
    • The SENCo analyses data relating to children with SEND on a termly basis.
    • The SENCo evaluates interventions at least half termly and makes changes where appropriate to enable children to make accelerated progress.

Back to top

3. How will the curriculum be matched to my child’s needs?

  • All work within class is pitched at an appropriate level so that all children are able to access it according to their individual needs. Typically this might mean that when learning, there would be three different levels of work set for the class, and where necessary, there are individual programmes.
  • The benefit of this type of differentiation is that all children can access learning at their own level.

Back to top

4. How will both school and I know how my child is doing and how will you help me to support my child’s learning? 

  • We believe that your child’s education should be a partnership between parents and teachers, therefore we aim to keep communication channels open and communicate regularly, especially if your child has complex needs.
  • School reports go home twice each year and are followed by parent consultation opportunities with the class or set teacher or open evenings.
  • We offer an open door policy where you are welcome to make an appointment to meet with either the class teacher, SENCo or ELSA (Emotional Literacy Support Assistant) and discuss how your child is getting on. We can offer advice and practical ways that you can help your child at home.
    • If your child meets the appropriate criteria for SEND, he/she will have an individual education plan (IEP). This is either discussed at Parents’ Evening or sent home if you are not able to attend. You will then have the opportunity to make an appointment to discuss the targets with the class teacher. The IEP is reviewed termly and parents are given a child-friendly copy. The targets set are SMART (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, Time scaled) targets with the expectation that the child will achieve the target by the time it is reviewed.
    • If your child has complex SEND he/she may be part of an IPA (Inclusion Partnership Agreement) or have a Statement of SEN, which means that a formal meeting will take place to discuss your child’s progress. Parents, any outside agencies and school staff working with your child will be invited. A report will be written and distributed to those invited as well as to the Principal Special Needs Officer in Winchester..
    • As a school we measure children’s progress in learning against national expectations and age related expectations.
    • The class teacher continually assesses each individual child and notes areas where they are improving and where further support is needed. As a school, we track children’s progress from entry at Year 3 through to Year 6, using a variety of different methods including National Curriculum levels, Reading and Spelling ages and/or Boxall Profiles.
    • Children who are not making expected progress are identified through Pupil Progress meetings with the Class teacher and Deputy / Head teacher. In this meeting a discussion takes place concerning why individual children are experiencing difficulty and what further support can be given to aid their progression.
    • When the child’s IEP is reviewed, comments are made against each target to show what progress the child has made. If the child has not met the target, the reasons for this will be discussed, then the target may be adapted into smaller steps or a different approach may be tried to ensure the child does make progress.
    • Class teachers are on the playground after school for brief messages and appointments can be made for other discussions.
    • Our SENCo is not class-based and is available to meet parents by appointment.

Back to top

 5. What support will there be for my child’s overall well-being? 

  • We are an inclusive school; we welcome and celebrate diversity. All staff believe that children having high self-esteem is crucial to a child’s well-being. We have a caring, understanding team looking after our children.
  • The class teacher has overall responsibility for the pastoral, medical and social care of every child in his/her class, therefore this would be the parents’ first point of contact. If further support is required the class teacher liaises with the SENCo or ELSAs for further advice and support. This may involve working alongside outside agencies such as Health and Social Services, and/or the Behaviour Support Team.
  • The school has 2 ELSAs who work with vulnerable children and parents, under the direction of the deputy headteacher.
  • The school has a Nurture Group called Rockets, which runs 4 afternoons a week. Nurture groups offer a short term, focused, intervention strategy, which addresses barriers to learning arising from social/emotional and/or behavioural difficulties, in an inclusive, supportive manner.
  • The school has a policy regarding the administration and managing of medicines on the school site, which can be found on the school website or a hard copy on request from the school office.
    • Parents need to contact the school office if medication is recommended by Health Professionals to be taken during the school day.
    • On a day to day basis the Welfare Assistant oversees the administration of any medicines.
    • All members of staff have regular training and updates of conditions and medication affecting individual children so that everyone is able to manage medical situations should they arise.
    •  All staff and pupils follow a clear reward and sanctions system that is designed to promote positive outcomes.
    • If a child has behavioural difficulties an Individual Support Plan (ISP) is written alongside the child to identify the specific issues, put relevant support in place and set targets. This is shared with parents. As a result of the support we give, we have very few exclusions. After any behaviour incident, we expect children to reflect on their behaviour with an adult, often completing a reflection form. This helps to identify why the incident happened and what the child needs to do differently next time to change and improve his/her behaviour.
    • Attendance of every child is monitored on a daily basis by the office team. Lateness and absence are recorded and reported to the deputy head teacher. Support is given through incentive schemes. Good attendance is actively encouraged throughout the school.
    • Our school ethos is based upon the concept of Rights, Respect and Responsibilities where we believe it’s important to give children a say in their education. All children are members of the School Council and their elected representatives meet with staff to discuss suggested improvements to the school.
    • Children who have IEPs (Individual Education Plans) discuss their targets with their class teacher or LSA.
    • There is an annual pupil questionnaire where we actively seek the viewpoints of children, especially concerning being able to speak to an adult if they have a worry.
    • If your child has an IPA (Inclusion Partnership Agreement) or Statement of SEN his/her views will be sought before any review meetings.

Back to top

6.  What specialist services and expertise are available at or accessed by the school?  

  • The school has good links with Forest Park Special School and The Clifford Centre Pupil Referral Unit for advice, training and integration programmes.
  • The school has links with many outside agencies. These are involved when the school needs expert advice for children with both educational and non-educational needs. The school is supported by an Educational Psychologist, Speech and Language Therapist, Occupational Therapist, Physiotherapist, Teacher Advisor for children with physical difficulties, Teacher Advisor for ICT for children with physical difficulties, Teacher Advisor for children with visual impairment, Teacher Advisor for children with hearing impairment, Behaviour Support Team, Outreach support from Forest Park Special School, Children’s services, Locality Team, Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service and Ethnic Minority and Travellers Achievement Service.
  • Our SENCo attends half termly meetings led by an Educational Psychologist (EP) for training or to discuss different strategies for support.

Back to top

 7.  What training has the staff supporting children with SEND had or having? 

  • We currently have 2 members of staff trained as ELSAs who receive regular support from the Educational Psychologist.
  • We currently have 2 LSAs who have completed Nurture Group training.
  • One LSA has currently had training in delivering Speech & Language programmes from a Speech & Language therapist.
  • A number of staff are Team Teach trained to support children with behavioural difficulties.
  • All of our LSAs have had training in Assessment for Learning, delivering reading/phonics programmes and in Behaviour Management.
  • LSAs are trained by physiotherapists and occupational therapists when appropriate.
  • Staff are able to request training in specific areas if necessary.
  • We may seek training for staff from external agencies when needed for individuals.

Back to top

8. How will my child be included in activities outside the classroom, including school trips? 

  • All children are included in all parts of the school curriculum and we aim for all children to be included on school trips. We will provide the necessary support to ensure that this is successful, which sometimes means involving the parent.
  • A risk assessment is carried out prior to any off site activity to ensure health & safety will not be compromised. In the unlikely event that it is considered unsafe for a child to take part in an activity, then alternative activities which will cover the same curriculum areas will be provided in school.

Back to top

9. How accessible is the school environment? 

  • As a single storey building, all areas of the school are accessible for disabled pupils, including those in wheelchairs. There are also separate toilet and changing/shower facilities.
  • The school has a purpose-built physiotherapy suite. This room is a wonderful environment for the children to carry out their daily physiotherapy/occupational programmes and has been equipped with a variety of stimulating accessories. It is also used for children following programmes to develop gross and fine motor skills and is a quiet environment suitable for auditory processing programmes.
  • We liaise with EMTAS (Ethnic Minority and Travellers Achievement Service) who assist us in supporting our families with English as an additional language.

 10. How will the school prepare and support my child to join the school, transfer to a new setting or the next stage of education and life? 

  • Abbotswood has good links with local feeder schools and the Inclusion Managers from each school liaise prior to transition to discuss future provision for children with special educational and/or disability needs. If a child has a statement or IPA (Inclusion Partnership Agreement), in order to ensure smooth transition, the Inclusion Manager at Abbotswood attends Year 2 annual reviews/IPA reviews , and for those children moving on, the secondary school Inclusion Manager is invited to attend the child’s Year 6 annual review/IPA review. Depending upon the need, the Inclusion Manager and/or LSAs might make several visits to the child’s current school, both to discuss his/her needs and to meet the child. To ensure a smooth transition, the Inclusion Manager also meets with the Inclusion Managers of the feeder and secondary schools to discuss all children’s special educational needs, whether or not the child has a statement.
  • We sometimes write social stories or provide photo albums for children if transition is potentially going to be particularly difficult and we arrange extra pre-induction day visits to the next school with ELSAs.

Back to top

11. How are the school’s resources allocated and matched to children’s special educational needs? 

  • We have a team of 23 LSAs part-funded from the SEN budget. They support in class during literacy and maths and also deliver programmes designed to meet individual children’s needs.
  • We ensure that the needs of all children with SEND are met to the best of the school’s ability with the funds available.

Back to top

12. How is the decision made about what type and how much support my child will receive?

  • The SENCo/Inclusion Manager, class teacher and sometimes other professionals discuss the child’s needs and what type of support would be appropriate.
  • Individual children will require different levels of support in order to bridge the gap to achieve age expected levels.
  • Teachers/LSAs review children’s targets to ensure they are being met and to check how much progress the child is making against national/age expected levels.
  • The SENCo also receives verbal feedback from the teacher, pupil and parent.
  • If the gap narrows, children may no longer meet the criteria for SEND. However, teachers will continue to monitor progress regularly.

Back to top

13. How are parents involved in the school? How can I be involved? 

  • Parents are invited into school to support in areas such as reading or school trips.
  • Voice of Abbotswood is a group of parents who meet with the senior leadership team to discuss issues raised by any parents and work together to improve systems within school.
  • Friends of Abbotswood is a group of parents working in partnership with the school and fundraising  to achieve our collective goals.

Back to top

14. Who can I contact for further information? 

  • First point of contact is your child’s class teacher to share your concerns.
  • Contact the school Admin Office to arrange to meet Mrs Stephens, our Inclusion Manager/SENCo.
  • Mr Moore, headteacher and Ms Brocklesby and Mrs Moore, deputy headteachers, are also available.
  • Look at the SEN or Behaviour  policies on our website.
  • Contact Parent Partnership - www3.hants.gov.uk/parentpartnership.
  • Contact IPSEA (Independent Parental Special Education Advice) –

          www.ipsea.org.uk/

Back to top